Thursday, July 4, 2019

Getting to Know Africa Through Quotes and Sayings

Getting to Know Africa Through Quotes and Sayings

African women form strong kinship bonds through many generations
African women form strong kinship bonds through many generations


African quotes and sayings in the Swahili and English language with teaching explanations.



Swahili - Kunguru hana wasiwasi kuhusu ujanja wa kuku.
English - The eagle does not worry about the cleverness of a chicken.
Lesson -  The proverb teaches that people in authority should be shown respect and people under them should not undermine their position of authority.


Swahili - Ni manyoya ambayo hufanya kuku awe mkubwa.
English - It is the feathers, which makes a chicken big.
Lesson - It is not a man’s size that makes him great, but his courage to achieve what he wants to. Through this proverb, we are encouraged to exhibit courage and determination.


Swahili - Kuku huwa hachagui kati ya vifaranga wake.
English - A hen does not choose among its young.
Lesson - He who wants to serve must not be motivated by evil intentions towards others. Neither should we look back at whatever happened in the past. One should forgive and forget and also not discriminate or revenge over past happenings.


Swahili - Wakati wa kukomaa ndio joogo huvunja bawa lake.
English - It is during growing that a cock breaks its wing.
Lesson - It is at the youth stage that we learn many things, trying to find ourselves. It is then that we can make a lot of mistake in life thus the need to be careful, not to make the worst of our lives.


Swahili - Ndege huketi juu ya mti anapenda
English - A bird sits on a tree it likes.
Lesson - This proverb teaches that everyone makes their own choices whether good or bad. You choose what you want your life to be.

The diverse continent of Africa is difficult to sum up in just a few African proverbs, quotes and sayings. 



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African boys and girls in South Africa.
African boys and girls in South Africa.

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

20 Things in Life You Need To Know Today

20 Things in Life You Need To Know Today

Here's what you need to know on African wisdom and African proverbs.



Hello! This your daily fix on stuff you need to know today.





A dog does not enter if the door is not open.

A foreigner's pity is like a thorn's shadow.

A man without enemies is like a river without stones.

A relative's slap hurts more than a stranger's.

By blackening another, you do not whiten yourself.

Crows gather where the flesh lies.

[Are You Listening?]


Even a thread of hair has its shadow.

Under the prettiest glove, the ugliest hand is hidden.

One man laughs at another and the devil at all.

Put not your nose in the pot that does not boil for you.

Sadness to the house where the hen crows and the cock keeps silent.

The husband doesn't know what all the village knows.

The locust lives only a little while, but it does great damage.

[ Learning Something?]


The man who goes to law often loses an ox to win a cat.

The pearl lies at the bottom of the sea, while the corpse floats on the surface.

The tongue breaks bones though it has none.

There is no bitterer fruit than foreigners in one's land.

Thieves nowadays are not in the forests but in the offices.

You cannot stop the wind, the water, or people's tongues.

Nakedness turns round, hunger goes straight.

[Devote More Time To Take Care Of Yourself Today]


Links to more valuable information

Read more about women on the African continent.






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Thursday, May 23, 2019

Egyptian proverbs and Facts About Ancient Egypt

Egyptian proverbs and Facts About Ancient Egypt If mendicity should, unfortunately, be your lot, knock at the large gates only.
Egyptian proverbs and Facts About Ancient Egypt
These Proverbs offer an honest example of Egypt used in the towns of the Nile. These sayings are useful, as they serve to show us how Egyptians judge of men and things, and in this respect it must be acknowledged that many are dictated by wisdom and understanding.

Egyptian proverbs and Facts About Ancient Egypt

A thousand cranes in the air are not worth one sparrow in the fist.


Egypt Name and Land Facts


Occupying the northeast corner of the African continent, Egypt is filled with a deep history of Africa. Egypt has a desert climate with hot, dry summers and moderate winters. It is located in Northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the Gaza Strip, and the Red Sea north of Sudan, and includes the Asian Sinai Peninsula. The English name Egypt derives from the ancient Greek name for the country Aigyptos, the Arabic name Misr can be traced to the ancient Akkadian misru meaning border or frontier.

If the dishes increase in number, it becomes known that they are from the houses of neighbours.


Egypt Population Facts


Most of the country is desert, so about 95% of the population is concentrated in a narrow strip of fertile land along the Nile River, which represents only about 5% of Egypt’s land area. Egypt is the most populous country in the Arab world and the third most populous country in Africa, behind Nigeria and Ethiopia. Around 42 percent of Egyptians are urbanites while 58 percent are rural dwellers.

If an onion causes his loud rejoicings, what then shall we say to sugar.


Egypt Agriculture Facts


Agriculture, hydrocarbons, manufacturing, and especially tourism drive the Egyptian economy. Other major exports are crude oil and petroleum products, fruits and vegetables, cotton, textiles, metal products, chemicals, and processed food. Egypt is bisected by the highly fertile Nile valley where most economic activity takes place.

The thief who understands his business does not steal.
from his own quarter

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

The people who rescue and kill

Unique Language of Zulu South African Proverbs

The unique language of a Zulu South African Proverb are embellished with figurative expressions, some of which are quickly understood, but others need explanation.



Unique Language of Zulu South African Proverbs



Unique Language of Zulu South African Proverbs 

Man with many years of African proverb wisdom


Ulahla imbo yako ngopoyiyana
You have cast away your own for that which you are not sure of.
This proverb is equivalent to the English one; A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.



Yimbabala yolwantunge
He is a buck of an endless forest.
A saying applied to a shiftless person, one who never continues long in any occupation.



Uzipembela emoyeni
You are lighting a fire in the wind.
Said to anyone who favors strangers in preference to relatives, or friends.



Yintlolela yombini
A spy for both.
Said of a snitch.



Akuko ramncwa lingagqimiyo kowalo umxuma
There is no beast that does not roar in its den.
This proverb means that a man recognizes no superior in his own establishment.



Inja yomoya
A dog of the wind.
A saying applied to anyone who has no settled plan of living.



Ukaka kampetu
The shield turned the wrong way.
This saying is applied to anyone who goes over from one party to another. It is a common expression for one who turns evidence against accomplices in crime.



Ngumpa wezala
It is a cob stripped of maize in an ashpit.
Said of a worthless character.



Isinama ndokunamatela
I, the grass, will stick fast to you.
The isinama is a kind of grass that sticks to one's clothing when it is touched, and can hardly be brushed off afterwards. This proverb is used as a warning to anyone to avoid a bad habit or an unworthy companion that cannot easily be got rid of.



Alitshonanga lingenandaba
The sun never sets without fresh news.
There is always hope for the new day to come.



Amaqotyazana angalaliyo emzini
They are people of experience who do not sleep in a strange place.
This proverb is used in praise of one who is smart in going a message, or who performs any duty at a distance quickly.



Wokolwa yeyokosa
You will prefer roasted meat.
This saying is applied to anyone who is boasting immoderately, as a warning that if he does not take care he will get into trouble when he will be glad to take whatever comes to hand. He will prefer roast meat because it is easily cooked, and he will have neither time nor means to boil it. This saying is also used as a threat, as if one said, I will punish you thoroughly.



Kuhla ngamqalamnye
Throats are all alike in swallowing.
This proverb is used when one asks another for anything, and implies, If you do not give to me now, I will not give to you when I have anything that you would like a share of.


Omasiza mbulala
The people who rescue and kill.
This saying is applied to Europeans. It first arose from the heavy demands made by Lord Charles Somerset upon the Ngqika people who were a royal Xhosa who lived west of the Great Kei River in return for English protection, it is sometimes put in this form, the people who protect with one hand and kill with the other.


[Read: African inspirational and motivational quotations about love and life.]


Links to more African Proverbs

In everyday life, African proverbs inspire with ancient words of wisdom.

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Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Good King African Proverbs

Good King African Proverbs

Good King African Proverbs



African Proverbs
African Proverbs

Approach the throne reverently, use power sensitively and wisely.


Who Sits Upon The Throne African Proverbs



A large chair does not make a king. - Sudanese Proverb

The way a chief acts affects the entire village. - Ugandan Proverb

A king cannot reign without the support of the elders. - Burundian Proverb

Words of a good King do not lock all the doors; they leave the right door open. – Zambian proverb

When there is peace in the country, the chief does not carry a shield. - Ugandan Proverb

The wise chief does not eat from two sides. - Malawian Proverb

He who fears the sun will not become chief. - Ugandan Proverb

When a king has good counselors, his reign is peaceful. - Ghana Proverb

When you befriend a chief remember that he sits on a rope. – Ugandan proverb




When great leaders use power wisely, they warrant allegiance and dedication long after they have passed away from this earth.



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Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Politics African Proverbs

Politics African Proverbs

Borana Oromo people Kenyan African Proverbs



Living in Kenya, Ethiopia, and Somalia, the Borana tribe have a long history of conflict, cattle raiding and fights over water and grazing among its various pastoral communities.


War has no eyes
War has no eyes

Politics, pastureland, conflict, War has no eyes Borana Oromo African proverbs





Fighting between the Borana and Gharri tribes historically erupts inside Ethiopia and Somalia along the Kenyan border, over water and grazing land. Both tribes are traditional pastoralists. The hard red earth shows through the thin grass of the sun-baked landscape, a wide expanse of thorny scrub, flat-topped thorn-trees and tall red anthills. Like almost all pastoralists in Africa, Borana men habitually go armed to defend their flocks but many are displaced.


Oromo African proverbs

Bir baani, dubbit affa ; d’uggadubbe tani namat wald’aba.
If facts are ignored, justice cannot be rendered yet, if one refuses to ignore the facts enemy is created.



Mali ijeese warani lubbu kuta 
The plan kills, the weapon only does the deed.


Nafi abba took abbatokot qoricha. 
A person’s life is precious to him but nothing to someone else.



Read more facts and food recipes about Africa


African people are praised for proverbs, history, traditions, and struggles. African people are extremely diverse within each African country. Made up of numerous tribes and people of many religious, social and ethnic groups within the geographical boundaries of the African country African borders are at times arbitrary. Learn more about Africa.

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Sunday, August 5, 2018

Meaning of Sankofa

An eye that the vultures peck at does not see; an ear that the vultures peck at does not hear – West African Proverb

What Is The Meaning Of Sankofa

Sankofa is visually expressed as a bird that flies forward while looking backward with an egg symbolizing the future in or near its mouth.



Sankofa is a word in the Twi (pronounced Tree) language of the Akan people of West Africa that translates to GO BACK AND GET IT san - to return ko - to go fa - to fetch to seek and take.

Sankofa


Used as a symbol of knowledge the world over, the concept of sankofa is derived from the Akan people of West Africa. The term sankofa comes from the words "san" (return), "ko" (go), and "fa" (look, seek, and take). The past illuminates the present, Sankofa Asante Adinkra symbol means know your history is to know yourself; the search for knowledge is a lifelong process.


The Akan believe that the past illuminates the present and that the search for knowledge is a lifelong process. The Sankofa symbol illustrates the quest for knowledge and the importance of learning from the past. Sankofa teaches us that we must go back to our roots in order to move forward. That is, we should reach back and gather the best of what our past has to teach us, so that we can achieve our full potential as we move forward.  


Visually and symbolically Sankofa is expressed as a bird that flies forward while looking backward with an egg symbolizing the future in or near its mouth. Sankofa means return and get it, symbolizing the importance of learning from the past. Sankofa also stands for you can always correct your mistakes or with wisdom use past experiences to build a promising future. Know your history is to know yourself.




Did you know?

Sankofa has a second popular symbol which was the original symbol derived from the Akan people of West Africa.

Sankofa


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